English 1101 Nuggets Quiz "Answered"

By the nature of some items on this quiz, many of your answers will be very different from the ones below.  The key is to identify the potential "nugget pitfalls" avoided in each of the answers and to ascertain whether you avoided similar pitfalls in your own answers. 
 

1) Describe briefly (two sentences max.) any situation or event you thought funny or disturbing in a movie or serial TV show you've seen recently (a TV series, that is, with actors, not a talk show, news show, etc.).

In one especially hilarious episode of Friends, Joey is trying to teach Ross to "talk dirty" to women, and when Chandler walks in and hears Ross "practicing," it appears to him that Ross is passionately attracted to Joey.

Note the literary present tense (N2) and the avoidance of straightforward plot summary (N1)—the sentence makes the point that the episode is hilarious.  Also note the double quote marks around the words "talk dirty" and "practicing" (N5s).
 

2) Introduce the following quotation from the first sentence of the first paragraph on p. 191 in our Little, Brown Reader: "she will not even look at me." 
Black Elk recalls loving a girl in his youth but having to be very persistent with her, as he says, "she [would] not even look at me" (191).

Note the indication of who is speaking (N3), the literary present (N2),the clarification of who the "she" (N3cr) in the quotation refers to, and changing the verb tense of "will" to "would" in square brackets to make the sentence work grammatically. 


3) Introduce the following quote from the one-sentence paragraph that is the first new "paragraph" on p. 193 in our Little, Brown Reader: "So this is what they did."

Black Elk describes High Horse's friends telling him that he must "be a man" and try to steal the Indian girl he loves. He says succinctly, "So this is what they did" (193).

Note the literary present (N2) in the introduction of the quote, the indication of who is speaking (N3), the use of double quote marks to indicate words used in a special sense (N5s), and clarification of what "this" refers to (N3cr).


4) Underline or put in quote marks the following titles:

a. The Simpsons [TV show]
b. "I Could Not Stop for Death" [poem]

c. Trifles [short play]

d. Ms. Magazine

e. Macbeth

f. "Are There Traditional Families Still?" [essay] [Note the question mark inside the quotation marks]

g. "Chipper Jones Goes Yard" [an article], from USA Today

h. "The Necklace" [short story]

i. The Scarlet Letter

j. Gone With the Wind [the movie]


Rewrite #'s 5-7, punctuating as needed (do not remove any of the quotation marks):
5) The closest Mom comes to swearing is saying "shoot" "darn" "Jiminey" or "Jumping Jehoshaphat"


The closest Mom comes to swearing is saying "shoot," "darn," "Jiminey," or "Jumping Jehoshaphat."
The closest Mom comes to swearing is saying "shoot!" "darn!" "Jiminey!" or "Jumping Jehoshaphat!"

The closest Mom comes to swearing is saying "shoot," "darn," "Jiminey," or "Jumping Jehoshaphat"!

In the second sentence, each quote is an exclamation; in the third sentence, the sentence itself is an exclamation.


6) Little Ryan's favorite question is "Why"

Little Ryan's favorite question is "Why?"

The word in quote marks is a question, so the question mark is an integral part of what's quoted and belongs inside the closing quote mark.


7) Did Bill Clinton really say "dammit"

Did Bill Clinton really say "dammit"?

blue bulletThe sentence itself is a question—the quote is not a question.


8) Introduce and quote a passage from any article in Signs of Life, using an ellipsis to indicate that you have left out words from within a single sentence.

Carl Matheson says, "comedy can be used to attack anybody at all who thinks that he or she has any sort of handle on the answer to any major question . . . merely for the pleasure of the attack" (296).

blue bulletNote the introduction of the quote indicating who is speaking (N3), the literary present tense in "says" (N2) and the correct spacing of the ellipsis points (N4s)Also note that the portions of the quote before and after the omission make clear grammatical sense together (N4g).

Here's the full text of the original source, from the first full paragraph on p. 296 (note that the omission comes from within a single sentence in the original):

"However, comedy can be used to attack anybody at all who thinks that he or she has any sort of handle on the answer to any major question, not to replace the object of the attack with a better way of looking at things, but merely for the pleasure of the attack" (296).


9) Introduce and quote a passage from any article in Signs of Life, using an ellipsis to indicate that you have left out an entire sentence or more.

In his essay, "The Simpsons, Hyper-Irony, and the Meaning of Life," Matheson argues that the show's writers bombard viewers with allusions to other literary works and cultural artifacts: "The Simpsons revels in the attack. . . . It plays games of one-upmanship with its audience members by challenging them to identify the avalanche of allusions it throws down to them" (296).

blue bulletNote the literary present in the introduction of the quote (N3), the use of a colon preceding the quote (N3) (since the introduction of it is an independent clause), the proper italicizing of the TV show title (N7) and putting the article title in quote marks (N7), and the correct spacing of the four-dot ellipsis (N4s)Also note that here, too, the portions of the quote before and after the omission make sense together. 

The full passage from the original, taken from the first full paragraph on p. 296, is as follows:

"The Simpsons revels in the attack. It treats nearly everything as a target, every stereotypical character, every foible, and every institution. It plays games of one-upmanship with its audience members by challenging them to identify the avalanche of allusions it throws down to them" (296).