Quotations Quiz Answered

Correct any errors in citation and documentation for #'s 1-4:

1) The speaker in W. D. Snodgrass's "Leaving the Motel" advises his or her lover to "Keep things straight: don't take/The matches, the wrong keyrings--/We've nowhere we could keep a keepsake--/Ashtrays, combs, things/That sooner or later others would accidentally find.(9-14)"

The speaker in W. D. Snodgrass's "Leaving the Motel" advises his or her lover to

                    Keep things straight: don't take

                    The matches, the wrong keyrings--

                    We've nowhere we could keep a keepsake--

                    Ashtrays, combs, things

                    That sooner or later others

                    Would accidentally find. (9-14)

Note that there are no quote marks used with block indention (Q3uq) and that the parentheses come after the period (Q3p).
 

2) In "Two Songs," by Adrienne Rich, the speaker says, "I'd call it love if love/ didn't take so many years/ but lust too is a jewel/ a sweet flower and what/ pure happiness to know/ all our high-toned questions/ breed in a lively animal."(720: 15-21).

In "Two Songs," by Adrienne Rich, the speaker says,

                    I'd call it love if love

                    didn't take so many years

                    but lust too is a jewel

                    a sweet flower and what

                    pure happiness to know

                    all our high-toned questions

                    breed in a lively animal. (15-21)

Note that there is no page number in the parentheses (Q4ln) and that the parentheses go outside the closing punctuation of the block quote (Q3p).
 

3) When Herrick's speaker tells virgin maidens, "Gather ye rosebuds while ye may(1)", he is encouraging them to "seize the day."

When Herrick's speaker tells virgin maidens, "Gather ye rosebuds while ye may," he is encouraging them to "seize the day" (1).

Note that the line number in the parentheses (Q4ln) goes at the end of the sentence, not the end of the quotation (Q1e).
 

4) The speaker in "The Negro Speaks of Rivers" says, "I've known rivers:/Ancient, dusky rivers./My soul has grown deep like the rivers."(8-10)

The speaker in "The Negro Speaks of Rivers" says, "I've known rivers: / Ancient, dusky rivers. / My soul has grown deep like the rivers" (8-10).

Note the spaces before and after the slashes (Q4lb) and between the closing quote mark and the parentheses (Q2).  Also note that the period has been moved from the end of the quotation to the end of the sentence—after the parentheses (Q2).
 

5) Which of the following (a-d) is correct:

c) Dickens intrudes even upon his own authorial commentary in the

opening sentence of The Chimes with a facetious remark on the

special relationship between writers and readers:

There are not many people—and as it is desirable that a story-

teller and a story-reader should establish a mutual understanding

as soon as possible, I beg it to be noticed that I confine this

observation neither to young people nor to little people, but

extend it to all conditions of people: little and big, young and

old: yet growing up, or already growing down again—there are not,

I say, many people who would care to sleep in a church.  (81)

Far from striving to keep the author behind the scenes in the illusion

that novels describe actual persons and events as modern writers do,

Dickens seems instead to impose his authorial presence. . . .

Note that the double spacing is uniform throughout (unlike in options a and d), and that the quote is indented from the left margin only (unlike option b).
 

6) Give correct works cited entries for the following (a-e):

a) The essay, "The Male Myth," which starts on p. 229 in our Little, Brown Reader text.

 Theroux, Paul. "The Male Myth."  The Little, Brown Reader. Eds. Marcia Stubbs

            and Sylvan Barnet. 12th edition.  Boston: Longman, 2012. 229-31. Print.
 

b) The play Hamlet, from the third edition of The Complete Works of Shakespeare, which is edited by David Bevington.  The book was published by Scott, Foresman and Company in Glenview, Illinois in 1980, and Hamlet is on pp. 1074-1120.

Shakespeare, William. Hamlet. The Complete Works of Shakespeare

            
Ed. David Bevington.  Third edition.  Glenview, Illinois: Scott, Foresman,

            1980.  1074-1120.
Print.
 

c) An article by Bill Williams titled "Re-Visioning the Double Play," from the scholarly journal, Academic Baseball, edited by Jack Johnson, published at the University of the Diamond Press in Atlanta, GA, in the 35th volume (the year 2001), on pages 295-375.

Williams, Bill.  "Re-Visioning the Double Play."  Academic Baseball 35 (2001):

            295-375. Print.
 

d) The 3rd edition of Boys Playing on Diamonds, written by Bill Williams and published in 2003 by the University of the Diamond Press in Atlanta, GA.  The book has 673 pages.

Williams, Bill.  Boys Playing on Diamonds.  3rd ed.  Atlanta: U of the Diamond P,

            2003.
Print.


e) An article by Tom Glavine entitled "A Bad Move," from the August 12, 2003 issue of the magazine, Major Mishaps, on pages 47-51. This article was accessed through the JSTOR database online, on September 12, 2003.

 
bullet Glavine, Tom. "A Bad Move." Major Mishaps August 12, 2003: 47-51.  JSTOR.

             Web.  September 12, 2003.