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Individual project 4

 

Four parts to this project (each roughly one or two pages' length):

These instructions are detailed. Read them very carefully. I recommend printing this page and highlighting and annotating each part before you get into the actual work. As always, let me know if you have questions. 

1) After reading and taking notes on chapter 14, compose a cordial and professional email addressed to the Chair of the English Department, Dr. Amy Berke (find her address in the MGA directory online). Tell her your English 5106 instructor has asked you to share your impressions of how well the course is generating meaningful learning thus far in the semester. The two primary objectives of this assignment are, first, mastery of Lannon and Gurak's instruction on workplace emails and second, your careful consideration of audience and tone. "Cc" me when you email Dr. Berke. So as you can see, you are in something of a delicate situation because you need absolutely to tell the truth about your impressions, but you must show tact in considering that Dr. Berke is my boss and I am receiving the message as well.  I assure you I can be objective in grading even when criticized, absolutely, but just think about the fact that I am grading you on this very assignment and giving you a course grade at the end of the semester as well!  This is a most awkward and delicate situation indeed!

  • Begin by developing an audience and use profile (see. p. 30) with Dr. Berke as primary audience and me as secondary audience. Email me this profile document separately after you email Dr. Berke.

  • Maintain a friendly and professional tone throughout, not ultra-formal, but not too casual either.

  • Keep the email brief--no more than four paragraphs (250 words, tops)--realize that Dr. Berke is an extremely busy professional, and that we are imposing on her time with this assignment. I do not anticipate that she will reply to your emails, but she certainly will read them.

  • At the end of the message, include some recommendations on how the course, so far as you see at this point, might be improved to increase student learning. Be especially careful with the tone here: be sure not to have a tone of complaining or harsh criticism (you can save that for end of course evaluations, as much as you like!).  A complaining tone often leads readers to think more about the writer than the core issue, discounting the "gripes" in many circumstances as whining, while carefully, tactfully worded criticism can generate significantly favorable results.

  • Proofread your email relentlessly, multiple times. For truly important email messages, it's a good practice to print them on paper for close editing. 

2) Only after reading chapter 15 carefully and completely, taking notes as you go, compose a positive adjustment letter following the scenario below. Begin by constructing an audience and use profile (p. 30), and create some kind of professional-looking letterhead for this document (I can help if you need it).  Save the the polished finished product as a PDF to submit, along with the audience and use profile, in this module's Individual project dropbox.

You work for Lowcountry Clockworks, Incorporated, a parts distributor based in Summerville, SC, and you have received a complaint from an irate customer who ordered a Hermle Clock Movement model 451 unit, but by an error in your shipping department, he received a Hermle model 261, which doesn't fit the clock the customer is repairing.  The customer, John D. Philips, is not a professional clock repair technician, but a retired U.S. Army colonel who is repairing a grandfather clock inherited from his mother. His letter of complaint expressed significant frustration, as not only was the wrong part sent, it took two weeks for delivery, despite an advertised promise of three-day delivery.

Read chapter 15 carefully, especially pp. 345-48, 350-51, and 361-64. Be mindful of document design and layout, and proofread and edit ruthlessly.

3) Also only after reading chapter 15 carefully and completely, taking notes as you go, compose a negative adjustment letter addressing Team Project 2 on p. 366 (you should not do this project with a team, however: just follow the scenario in this project to compose a letter yourself). Here, too, create some kind of professional-looking letterhead for the document (I can help if you need it), create an audience and use profile (p. 30), and save the finished product as a PDF to submit with the audience and use profile in this module's Individual project dropbox.

With this project also, attend especially to pp. 345-48, 350-51, and 361-64. Be mindful of document design and layout, edit and proofread relentlessly.

4) After reading chapter 18, especially the portion on Technical Marketing Materials, choose a product that you own and absolutely love, and compose a tri-fold brochure encouraging others to purchase this product. Follow these directions carefully:

  • Begin with an audience and use profile (p. 30), which should be submitted with the finished draft.

  • Write as if you are an independent dealer or reseller of the product, not an employee of the actual manufacturer or an actual seller of the product.

  • Use a brochure template from MS Word, MS Publisher, or some other quality source. Do not use the same template as in the plagiarism brochure from the last module.

  • You may research specs or other information about your product, but make all the copy here your own language. Do not use marketing materials or copy from the manufacturers or actual sellers of the product.

  • Follow all relevant principles of document design covered in earlier modules, use some color in the brochure, and include at least three visuals. You may give your company a name and logo, but it's not a definite requirement.

  • Save the final draft in PDF and submit it to the Individual project 4 dropbox along with the audience and use profile.

Submit parts 2-4, including audience and use profiles, separately to the Individual project 4 dropbox in D2L.

And do let me know if I can help with any part of the process. Email me, see me in the office, or set up a phone call!